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Yeasted Pumpkin Bread

Recipe by Leah Koenig

Yeasted Pumpkin Bread

Sephardi Jews traditionally eat foods made with pumpkin and squash on Rosh Hashanah, when they hold symbolic significance. Jewish traders also played a major role in spreading the New World gourd across the Mediterranean during the time of Columbus, and Sephardi cuisine continues to utilize pumpkin in many baked goods, jams, and other dishes today.

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New Potato Salad

Recipe by Tanya Tolchin

New Potato Salad

New potatoes—those dug just a few days before cooking—are a whole different story than the usual varieties you find at the supermarket. They are full of moisture and will cook up very fast. Poke often while boiling, as they will soften faster than you expect.

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Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Rugelach

Recipe by Heather Bien

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Rugelach

I embarked on this project in hopes of incorporating the flavors of my Southern upbringing—pecans, bourbon—into that beloved cookie of my adopted Jewish culture. Doesn’t barely sweet cream-cheese dough wrapped around a rich pecan filling sound like a match made in heaven? That’s because it is.

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Cran-Apple Jam

Recipe by Stacey Viera

Cran-Apple Jam

Jewish practice of making jams and other fruit preserves have roots in Ashkenazi and Sephardic communities. Preserving the sweetness of the season allows for special jams to be served at brit milah and other happy occasions. “In the old days,” Claudia Roden writes, “large quantities were made during their season to last through the year.

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Ritual Challah

Recipe by Beth Ricanati

Ritual Challah

I share this recipe with a nod to the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Manhattan. I have adapted and used this recipe of theirs, which a friend of mine shared with me, since the first time I made challah so long ago. Specifically, she said that it was used in a Mommy and Me cooking

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Aranygaluska (Hungarian Pull-Apart Bread)

Recipe by Leah Hadad

<em>Aranygaluska</em> (Hungarian Pull-Apart Bread)

Hungarian immigrants introduced aranygaluska, a traditional Hungarian coffeecake whose name means “golden dumpling,” to the US in the late-nineteenth to early-twentieth century. This coffeecake is the predecessor of what we identify today as monkey or pull-apart bread, which first appeared in the 1972 Betty Croker Cookbook and was later popularized by First Lady Nancy Reagan,

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Sweet Socca with Strawberries

Recipe by Jessica Grosman

Sweet Socca with Strawberries

Socca is a crisp flatbread made of chickpea flour that’s popular in Nice, France. It’s usually savory and served as an appetizer with wine, but I like to enjoy it with sweet toppings, like chocolate spread and fruit. Note: Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

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Chunky Chickpea Salad

Recipe by Jessica Grosman

Chunky Chickpea Salad

At least once a week, I mash chickpeas with some chopped herbs and a few glugs of high-quality extra-virgin olive oil for this simple lunchtime salad, inspired by a chunky hummus that I ate at SoHo House in Berlin a few summers ago. Note: Use organic ingredients whenever possible.

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Black Bean Fudgies

Recipe by Stacey Viera

Black Bean Fudgies

For those who eat kitniyot, these are a more nutritious spin on kosher-for-Passover brownies. They can be made year-round with traditional ingredients, too. What makes this indulgent Passover treat a bit more nutritious is the addition of protein- and fiber-rich beans, using a reasonable amount of sugar and employing neutral-tasting canola oil, which is proven

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