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Recipe Collection

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Baked Sea Bass with Artichokes, Mozzarella and Old Bay Seasoning

Baked Sea Bass with Artichokes, Mozzarella and Old Bay Seasoning Related:   dairy, fish, gluten-free, low-fat, Shabbat, Shavuot, Yom Kippur

Prep time: 5 mins

Cook time: 15-20 mins

Yield: Approximately 6 servings

This is one of my favorite creations—an easy, baked fish dish that is mild, buttery, cheesy and accented with Old Bay Seasoning (created by a German Jewish immigrant). The recipe draws inspiration from a beloved scallop-and-crab restaurant dish from my pre-Judaism days and also from the Jewish-Italian dish of mild fish baked with artichokes.

Ingredients

  • 1¾ to 2 pounds sea bass, skinned and deboned, rinsed, dried and cut into 1- to 1½-inch-cubes (or sablefish)
  • 2 cans (14 ounces each) artichoke hearts packed in water, well drained and coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (juice of about 1 fresh lime)
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste
  • 2½ to 3 teaspoons Old Bay Seasoning, or to taste
  • 2½ cups shredded part-skim, low-moisture mozzarella cheese
  • ½ cup shredded provolone cheese

Preparation

  • Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.
  • Toss the fish and artichokes with the melted butter and lime juice in a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish. Sprinkle with kosher salt and a good layer of Old Bay Seasoning. Bake until fish is done (it should flake easily with a fork and be opaque all the way through), 12 to 18 minutes.
  • Remove from oven. Turn the broiler on high. Top the fish and artichokes evenly with mozzarella and provolone. Broil the casserole until the cheese is melted and just lightly browned in spots, 3 to 5 minutes. Cool slightly before serving.
  • Reprinted with permission from Meatballs and Matzah Balls: Recipes and Reflections from a Jewish and Italian Life by Marcia Friedman (Elsa Jacobs Publishing, 2014).

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