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Leah Koenig

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About the Author

Leah KoenigLeah Koenig's work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Saveur, Epicurious, CHOW, BonAppetit.com, Modern Farmer, More, Time Out New York, Hemispheres and Tablet, among other publications. She is the author of Little Book of Jewish Appetizers (Chronicle Books, 2017), Modern Jewish Cooking (Chronicle Books, 2015) and The Hadassah Everyday Cookbook: Daily Meals for the Contemporary Jewish Kitchen (Rizzoli/Universe, 2011).

Berbere

Recipe by Leah Koenig

<em>Berbere</em>

This spice blend sits the heart of the Ethiopian pantry. Made with dried chili peppers and a lengthy list of other spices, it is both quite fiery and also complexly flavored. In Israel, Ethiopian home cooks often keep several large jars of homemade berbere in the cupboard or refrigerator to have on hand when making

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Doro Wot

Recipe by Leah Koenig

<em>Doro Wot</em>

Ethiopian Jews serve this fiery chicken stew for special meals. Heaps of onion, garlic and ginger meld together into a saucy base and get a big boost of flavor from the Ethiopian spice mix, Berbere.

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Sweet and Sour Cabbage Soup

Recipe by Leah Koenig

Sweet and Sour Cabbage Soup

Beet borscht is undoubtedly the most popular sweet and-sour soup within the Ashkenazi soup canon. But this cabbage-based soup, called krautsuppe in German, is just as delicious. It is traditionally served during the cold winter months when a bright, savory potage is especially comforting.

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Yeasted Pumpkin Bread

Recipe by Leah Koenig

Yeasted Pumpkin Bread

Sephardi Jews traditionally eat foods made with pumpkin and squash on Rosh Hashanah, when they hold symbolic significance. Jewish traders also played a major role in spreading the New World gourd across the Mediterranean during the time of Columbus, and Sephardi cuisine continues to utilize pumpkin in many baked goods, jams, and other dishes today.

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Sweet Cheese and Fig Strudel

Recipe by Leah Koenig

Sweet Cheese and Fig Strudel

For centuries, strudel was considered the national dish of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and it continues to maintain its powerful hold over Central European palates today. Enjoyed by the wealthy and humble classes alike, the process of hand stretching the dough to impossible thinness, then rolling it with sweet (apple, cherry, poppy seed) or savory (cabbage,

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Barley-Stuffed Mushrooms

Recipe by Leah Koenig

Barley-Stuffed Mushrooms

Mushrooms and barley were fixtures of the Eastern European Jewish kitchen, most notably paired in a nourishing bowl of mushroom barley soup. This appetizer also features the iconic duo, but showcases them a little differently. Here, mushroom caps are stuffed with tender barley that has been dressed up with Parmesan, fresh herbs, and a splash

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Lahmajun

Recipe by Leah Koenig

<em>Lahmajun</em>

Jews hailing from Syria, Turkey, Lebanon and surrounding countries took the lead from their neighbors and fell in love with these small flatbreads topped with ground lamb or beef. The name is quite literal, stemming from a contraction of the Arabic words laham b’ajin or “meat with dough.” The yeasted dough is rolled quite thin

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Creamy Sorrel Soup with Harissa

Recipe by Leah Koenig

Creamy Sorrel Soup with <em>Harissa</em>

Eastern European Jews love sorrel—a green that resembles spinach but tastes sour like rhubarb—as the base for a summery soup called schav. Big pots of the summery green get simmered down with water and thickened with beaten egg yolk, then served chilled with sour cream, boiled potato, and chopped fresh radishes and scallions. I personally

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