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Sala Levin

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About the Author

Sala LevinSala Levin is a writer for Moment Magazine, the nation's largest independent Jewish publication, covering Jewish politics, culture and religion. She's written about Israeli street food, Jewish ghosts, famous heretics and much more. Sala first fell in love with cooking in college, when 11 am classes left her lots of time to putter in the kitchen. Now, she's more often found bookmarking her favorite recipes online and trying frantically to cook them all in her free time.

Falafel

Recipe by Sala Levin

Falafel

Falafel, the ubiquitous Middle Eastern street food, has become a Parisian must-eat. Food critics and tourists alike praise the chickpea sandwiches to be found among the pastries and pâtés in the City of Light. If a stop in the Jewish quarter of Paris isn’t on your summer itinerary, you can make this falafel, adapted from

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Deep Roots for Jewish Food from Spain

by Sala Levin

Deep Roots for Jewish Food from Spain

Spain isn’t the easiest place to find Jewish food, perhaps for one reason above all: pork. It’s everywhere. Pigs’ legs dangle in market stalls and restaurant windows, and ham is nestled atop nearly every dish. In one courtyard restaurant in the southern city of Cordoba – home to the towering rabbinic figure Maimonides, no less

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Vegetarian Adafina

Recipe by Sala Levin

Vegetarian <em>Adafina</em>

This recipe is a quick vegetarian version of the Sephardic hamin, the Sabbath dish that would traditionally slow-cook overnight. It’s called adafina by the Jews of Spain and cholent to Ashkenazic Jews of Eastern Europe. Though adafina customarily includes meat, this vegetarian version keeps the spirit of the dish. It incorporates greens, as was common among Tunisian Jews, once so influenced by Spain. Adapted from Gil Marks’s Encyclopedia of Jewish Food and from Smitten Kitchen.

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